Category: PKS

InPKSSeries
Microservice Architecture Microservice architecture is way of designing applications where developers split a large application into many independent services, or microservices. Applications that are not composed of services are called monolithic, as the entire code base runs as one giant process. When you start a monolithic web app, you typically start it up by running…
InPKSSeries
Microservice Architecture Microservice architecture is way of designing applications where developers split a large application into many independent services, or microservices. Applications that are not composed of services are called monolithic, as the entire code base runs as one giant process. When you start a monolithic web app, you typically start it up by running…
InPKSSeries
When it comes to Security, VMware PKS has several levels and considerations. We can leverage the Microsegmentation of Microservices all the way to scanning an image in Harbor, and permit or deny a developer from downloading or pushing a particular image.  Let’s take a look at the different levels that PKS Security is working to help provision a trusted environment.  When we think…
InPKSSeries
VMware PKS fully leverages vSphere NSX-T. Let’s take a look at the supported NSX-T design and implementation. NSX-T licenses come with PKS, so there is no reason not to leverage the best in class network virtualization. First, let’s take a look at what is available by using open source networking, and what the advantages are…
InPKSSeries
State Many people associate state with databases, and that’s fair enough; databases are most certainly stateful and a prime use case. State as a concept is broader than databases, and so to understand state in Kubernetes, and in particular the difference between StatefulSets and PersistentVolumes, let’s dive into state abstractly. State is the condition or…
InPKS
Today we are going to talk about storage design with PKS. Before we can talk about what is supported and how it works, let’s make sure we understand why we need persistent storage. Datadog has given us statistics that in 2018, seven out of ten cloud-native applications needed persistent storage. So how can the application…
InPKS
Disposability Kubernetes is designed to facilitate many cloud native principles; for example, disposability. Disposability means that workloads should be ephemeral where possible – easily replaced rather than migrated, fixed or upgraded directly. Disposability is often described as managing servers like “cattle not pets.” That means don’t groom long living servers, dialing them in manually, SSH’ing…